Announcements

To find ways to sell, recycle, donate and diminish your stuff
check out Moving It On

 

May 11, 2017

Welcome Flyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PL Village Council Community Welcome Committee.

 

April 17, 2017

Local Plant Sales Greet Spring

The 2017 Jefferson County Master Gardner Foundation Spring Plant Sale is happening on Saturday, May 6 at HJ Carroll Park, 9884 WA-19, in Chimacum. Perennials, annuals, and starts of plants suited to our area will be available along with the advice and  dialogue with the members of the foundation. Hours are 9:30 a.m.-12:30 pm. additional info available at www.jcmgf.org.

The Nordland Garden Club holds its biennial Plant Sale on Saturday, May 6, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m at 320 Garden Club Rd., Marrowstone Island. This fundraising event supports several community projects, including Chimacum Schools Pi Program, the Backpack program at Chimacum Schools, college scholarships, and maintenance of the clubhouse and grounds as a place for community gatherings.

The Tri-Area Garden Club and Chimacum High School Horticulture Department holds their annual plant sale on Saturday, May 13, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The Plant Sale will be held in the Entry Commons at Chimacum High School and in the Green House at the back of the school.

Small bills are appreciated when paying for plants. Coffee and bars will be available for donations. The sale is a fund raiser for the Tri-Area Garden Club’s gardening ventures and grants including Chimacum High School’s participation in the national Bee Campus USA. This year’s grant winners include Habit for Humanity and the Gathering Place.

 

February 21, 2017

Water Main Flushing 

Olympic Water and Sewer will start annual water main flushing in Port Ludlow on March 1 and will continue through the end of May. This will take place intermittently as manpower allows. Work will occur Monday through Friday during the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The crews will flush the mains using fire hydrants until the water runs clear. “A-Boards” will be put out on streets prior to flushing to notify residents.

This action is designed to flush away secondary contaminants that are left behind by the water. Department of Health terms Primary contaminants as those associated with known health issues. Secondary contaminants are associated primarily with aesthetic issues such as, but not limited to, color in the water and staining of plumbing fixtures. The lines need to be flushed periodically to prevent buildup of these contaminants and to prevent problems to the water system.

The flushing may cause a temporary change in the appearance of the water. The changes are generally in color, ranging from brownish to black in extreme cases. OWSI recommends that during the time of the flushing that no water should be run in the homes. Using water at the same time as the flushing could draw colored water into household plumbing. The discolored water might appear not only in the tap but also in hot water tanks and toilet tanks. In most cases after the flushing is complete running your tap for a few minutes will eliminate the discoloration. It is a temporary condition and the water should quickly return to normal. There are no known health issues associated with the discoloration.

Please call Olympic Water and Sewer at (360) 437-2101 should you have any questions or if you experience difficulties with your water returning to normal. For emergencies call 877-826-5787.

 

February 19, 2017

If You’re Dreaming about Dirt…

by Kateen Fitzgerald, Director of Dirt

Receive your Permaculture Design Certificate with emphasis on Modern Homesteading from The Dirt Rich School.  Located outside of Port Townsend in DiscoveryBay, The Dirt Rich School offers year round opportunities in the art of small scale farming, food production, fiber processing, animal wifery, and traditional homesteading skills.

For over a decade we’ve cultivated a 40 acre site and agricultural classroom providing a vibrant and diverse demonstration of mixed animal and vegetable systems, including a food forest, integrated free range poultry systems, a tri-purpose primitive sheep breed for fiber, meat, and milk production, and innovative building and homesteading techniques.

Registration is now open for our annual Permaculture Design Course Weekly Lecture Series! The Fall program is still open. We will accept applications until March 24. Information at thedirtrichschool@gmail.com.

Permaculture studies and applies holistic home and land solutions that are applicable in rural and urban contexts at any scale, using a multidisciplinary toolbox including agriculture, water harvesting, energy, natural building, waste management, animal systems, appropriate technology, economics, and community development.

Join other community members in the classroom and on the land to apply these beneficial techniques to design flourishing home, garden, and landscape systems.  Kateen’s philosophy is to over-deliver with content so students are given all the tools they need to accomplish the task of restoration on any scale. This 12 lecture series, running Thursdays from April 13 to June 29, was deliberately rolled out on a week by week basis, so people unable to do a conventional PDC can do so at a moderate weekly pace over the course of three months.

Beginning in April, our annual internship, The Farm Craft Internship, offers a three month, on site learning opportunity to get your hands dirty and dive into farm and homestead scale land management. This program runs twice per year, Spring Term April 3 – June 30 and Fall Term July 31 – October 27, and includes five full days of hands on homesteading and agricultural experience per week, as well as the 12 week Permaculture Design Course Lecture Series. Upon graduation you will receive a Permaculture Design Certificate.

For more information about the Internship or to sign up for the Permaculture Design Course lecture series or the Permaculture Design course and internship, go to The Dirt Rich School.org. The courses are offered at Dirt Rich School, 1463 W Uncas Rd, Port Townsend, Washington 98368. See the website for a price list, https://thedirtrichschool.org/ or call 360-379-1443.

 

January 31, 2017
WIC helps Jefferson County Families Make Ends Meet

As food costs and economic challenges mount, many young families turn to the Jefferson County Public Health. The Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplementary food program helps them close the gaps in a family food budget. It helps pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children to the age of five to eat well and stay healthy by providing healthy foods and personalized support.

The program provides organic fruits/vegetables, whole grain bread, breakfast cereals, milk, cheese, eggs, juice, baby foods and infant formula. The WIC food package can add $50-$100, per eligible family member, to your monthly budget. WIC highly encourages breastfeeding, with additional food for breastfeeding mothers.

Since 2000, the Jefferson County median household income of $46,651 has been at least $10,000 below the median for Washington State households, according to the 2014 Community Health Assessment. Lower incomes and higher cost of living here make it challenging for young families to make ends meet. A family of four with an income of $44,955 or less would qualify for WIC. Women, Infants and children that participate in Apple Health are income eligible for WIC.

Whether you are a parent staying home with a newborn, or someone working to meet the needs of your young family, WIC is here for you during this brief time when your kids are young. WIC also serves families with eligible foster kids and grandparents caring for their young grandchildren.

For more information or to enroll for WIC, call 360-385-9400 to schedule an appointment at the Port Townsend, Chimacum, or Quilcene clinic. For more information on programs or services provided by Jefferson County Public visit the website at www.jeffersoncountypublichealth.org. For questions contact Karen Obermeyer, kobermeyer@co.jefferson.wa.us, 360-385-9400.

 

December 15, 2016

Court Decision Affects Building in County

A state Supreme Court decision affecting water rights has caused frustration among builders throughout the state. Counties now must now ensure that water is legally available before granting new building permits. The new rules affect hydrology restrictions such that new buildings will not be able to depend on wells for their water source as they have in the past.

The new rules are a response to the complaints of some residents and a group called Futurewise. It is aimed at protecting water quality, flow, and wildlife. Some counties have instituted rules requiring a hydraulic study to show that a new well will not affect streams or existing water rights.

Proponents maintain that the new rules make sense because they ensure that new buildings have legal and physically available water. Many consumers say that fulfilling the requirements is too expensive and nearly impossible to accomplish. Some complain that intensions to build on their properties have been scuttled by the ruling and has resulted in loss of money and dreams.

Across the state about 300,000 permit-exempt wells serving one million people exist. Between 2,000 and 8,000 new wells are added yearly.

 

December 15, 2016

Resources Available for Alzheimer Caregivers

For those caring for someone with memory loss who need information and support, Alzheimer’s Association family caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for people to learn and share. Gain emotional support from others who are also a unique journey of providing care to a person with memory loss. Meetings are held the second Thursday of the month, from 1:00-2:30 pm, at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N Sequim Ave, Room 401, Sequim, WA 98382. For information call Carolyn Lindley at (360) 683-5294.

Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more information, visit www.alz.org.

 

November 11, 2016

Art Gallery and Classes Open at the Old Alcohol Plant

The Old Alcohol Plant is currently booking 2017 art classes and gallery exhibitions.

Art Classes Currently Scheduled in 2017 (more coming):

  • Beaded Ring Class – Friday, January 13
  • Paper Flowers – Friday, February 3
  • Macramé Bracelet – Friday, February 10
  • Wirework Earrings – Friday, February 17
  • Stone Sculpting – Friday, June 4 – Sunday, June 6

First Saturday Art Walk Openings, Six Week Displays: Art Walk Openings and displays in the coming year are scheduled for January 7, March 4, May 6, July 1, September 2, and November 4. All dates are still available for exhibitors.

Display and Sell Art at the Alcohol Plant: The Alcohol Plant is seeking art by local artists with a Pacific Northwest/Puget Sound focus for display at bi-monthly openings in 2017. Work with OAP staff to choose an opening date that works for you (you must be present). OAP can sell pieces for you at 25 percent commission – set prices accordingly. Staff will promote your opening and have open gallery hours when guests and the public can view the work. Gift shop space is available. You are responsible for framing; we will help with hanging and signage.

To Teach a Class at the Alcohol Plant: The instructor sets the price per student; classroom space costs $200 and includes tables and chairs and set-up. We will promote the class and can run registration for the cost of processing fees, or you may run your own registration. Classroom fee is negotiable for students who book overnight stays while taking the class.

Email apalmer@oldalcoholplant.com to schedule a classroom or gallery tour and to discuss dates and other details.

 

Alzheimer’s Association Offers Caregiver Support Group

Caring for someone with memory loss? Do you need information and support? Alzheimer’s Association family caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for people to learn, share and gain emotional support from others who are also on a unique journey of providing care to a person with memory loss. Meetings are held the second Monday of the month, from 10:30 am – 12:00 pm, at Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Rd, Chimacum, WA 98325. For information call Linda Whiteside at (206) 529-3875.

About the Alzheimer’s Association: The Alzheimer’s Association is the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more information, visit www.alz.org.

 

February 13, 2016

Announcing the Port Ludlow Hiking Club Website

The Port Ludlow Hiking Club has a new website, http://www.portludlowhikingclub.com, to promote our club and showcase the beauty of the Olympic Peninsula and beyond.  Developed by club member John Fillers, the website includes information and pictures of past hikes, a link to popular hikes, the Hiking Club schedules and other useful information for hikers.

The HIKES tab displays the last twelve hikes photographed by the club with captions describing the photos. The photos allow hikers to share their experience with family and friends and let members who did not participate in the hike see what they missed.

The TRAILS tab displays frequently used trails and can help prospective hikers know what to expect on a given hike.

Information about upcoming hikes can be found on the SCHEDULE page.  The ABOUT page gives the history of the hiking club and information on how to participate.  If you have any questions, please fill out the form on the CONTACT page.

 

 

February 10, 2016

Guidelines for Catastrophic Event Preparation

This is part a series of Disaster Preparedness articles prepared by Rob Stern, recently appointed PLVC Disaster Preparedness Director. This guideline and copies of disaster preparedness articles will also be available on the PLVC website, www.plvc.org

Are you prepared?

In the event of a catastrophic event it may take days for emergency help to arrive. Be a leader; know how to protect yourself, your family, and our community. In preparation for such an event, it is wise to follow these instructions.

Have a battery powered radio or television in order to monitor news broadcasts and civil defense information. But keep in mind that there may be conflicting reports during and immediately following a mass casualty event.

Do not rely on having electricity.

Purchase a 12v power converter. This will allow you to keep both your laptop and cell phone charged from your car’s 12-volt plug-in.

Use Text Messaging for necessary communications.  Text Messaging may work when other means of communications do not.

To have access to critical information from this Guide, print copies of whatever information you feel is relevant. Print and distribute your family contact plan — and keep it in a binder for immediate reference.

Keep your car’s gas tank at least half full. Service stations will not have electricity to pump gas.

Have some cash on hand with your emergency supplies — ATM and credit card transactions will not be working.

At a minimum keep a 72-hour supply of water and food on hand for each member of your family and for your pets, along with any prescription medications you may require.

The Emergency First Aid section in this guide is intended to help you keep someone alive until trained first responders arrive. Not providing immediate first aid, during the critical first hour, may result in the death of the victim.

If you are in the immediate area of a disaster — rely on the Disaster Preparedness Block Captains, police, fire, and other officials for instructions. If you are not in the immediate area — STAY OUT!

To prevent the spread of disease, wash your hands as often as possible. Consider using a hand disinfectant to save water.

For additional information:  http://www.911EMG.com.

 

Recycling in Jefferson County Has Changed! 

Jefferson County now accepts: 

Rigid plastic plant pots (12 inch maximum), buckets (limit of 3), tubs (dairy, margarine, salsa containers. Rinse containers. Do not put containers in plastic or paper bags.

Clear, brown, and green glass bottles and jars with or without labels. NO blue glass.

Mixed paper including mail catalogs, newspapers, toilet paper rolls, paper bags, phone books, magazines, paper boxes from cereal, shoes, eggs, etc., unwaxed cardboard. Please breakdown and flatten all cardboard boxes. 

Metal cans with no lids, clean aluminum cans, pans and foil

Plastic bottles and jugs without lids.

Jefferson County does not accept: 

Plastic lids and caps                            Juice cartons

Used paper coffee cups                      Food contaminated paper

Clam shells                                          Pet food bags

Plastic bags                                         Milk cartons

Crinkly plastic containers                    Waxed cardboard

Deli containers                                    Plastic silverware

Food storage bags                               Plastic wrap

Do not place in with recycled glass: 

Ceramics         Light bulbs      Pyrex glass      Window and mirror glass

Recycle these Special Cases at: 

All compact fluorescent bulbs and tubes – HHW facility in the PT Boat Haven

Plastic bags – local QFC or Safeway

Hazardous waste, such as paint, electronics, batteries, motor oil, herbicides, etc – call 360-385-9160 or go to https://solidwaste.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/mrw-collection-facility.pdf. 

Other Information: Skookum.org, 360-385-7678.

Port Ludlow recycling is located at the Village Center, 40 Village Way. It is open 24 hours, 7 days a week.

 

Board of County Commissioners Meetings

Monday mornings, except fifth Mondays

BoCC Chambers, County Courthouse, Port Townsend.

Get an abbreviated agenda on Sunday in the Peninsula Daily News and a full agenda on the County website at www.co.jefferson.wa.us/.

Meetings are open to the public. Briefings by the Commissioners are followed by hearings, discussions and other business